Beer Camp® Tropical IPA

Stout Summerfest®

Beer Camp® Tropical IPA

Fruit-forward hops take this IPA to the tropics.

Beer Camp is the ultimate brewing experience. We invite beer fans into our brewery nearly every week to design their own beer and then we bring it to life. Each spring, we’ll feature one of our favorite collaborations from the previous year. This year’s selection features intensely aromatic hop varietals rich with the flavors of the tropics. We use Citra, Mosaic and El Dorado hops to create bright fruit-forward flavors of mango, papaya and bitter orange.

Overview

  • Alcohol Content 6.7% by volume
  • Beginning gravity 16.0° plato
  • Ending Gravity 3.0° plato
  • Bitterness Units 55

Ingredients

  • Yeast Ale yeast
  • Bittering Hops Amarillo
  • Finishing Hops Mosaic, Citra, Comet, El Dorado
  • Malts Two-row Pale, Munich, Honey

Food Pairing

  • Cuisine Spicy Szechuan beef, Jerk Chicken, Thai Green tofu curry
  • Cheese Aged Monterey Jack, Asiago
  • Dessert Key Lime Pie, Kiwi Trifle

Brewing is as much art as science, and all beer specifications and raw materials are subject to change at our brewers' creative discretion.

  • Ale versus Lager

    All beer is broken down into two camps: ale or lager. The principal difference is the variety of yeast. Ales use a yeast called Saccharomyces cerevisiae, referred to as “top fermenting” because of the frothy foam created during fermentation. Lagers use a yeast called Saccharomyces pastorianus, called “bottom fermenting” because of the slower, restrained fermentation process. Ales are fermented at warmer temperatures and generally produce more fruity and spicy aromas from the yeast. Lagers are fermented at cooler temperatures and produce cleaner, more reserved aromas, which let the malt and hops shine through.

  • Bitter vs. Hoppy

    There is a general misconception regarding the bitterness of beer versus how hoppy a beer tastes. A beer’s IBU number is based on a measurement of how much bitter hop acid is in the packaged beer. Hoppiness on the other hand, is a relative thing and can’t be put into numbers. If both bitterness and hoppiness come from adding hops to beer, how can bitterness and hoppiness be disconnected?
    Bitterness comes from adding hops to the kettle. There, the boiling process causes a chemical change in the hops (isomerization) which allows the resinous acids to mix with the liquid without separating out. Adding hops to the kettle after the boiling has stopped or adding hops into the fermenter (such as in dry hopping or our hop torpedo process) allows hop oils to mix with the beer—the source of most of the hop flavor and aroma—without adding bitterness. A beer can be hoppy but not bitter, and vice versa, but looking only at IBU doesn’t give a good measure of the hop flavor in a finished beer.

  • Dry Hops

    We work hard to get strong hop flavors into our beers and one of the ways we do that is through dry hopping. Dry hopping refers to the addition of whole-cone hops to the fermentation tanks. The addition of hops to cold beer allows the aromatic oils and resins to infuse the beer with flavor and aroma without adding any additional bitterness.