Narwhal<sup>&reg;</sup> Imperial Stout

Hoptimum® Imperial IPA Harvest Single Hop IPA - 291 Varietal

Narwhal® Imperial Stout

A malt-forward monster, highlighting the depths of malt flavor.

Narwhal Imperial Stout is inspired by the mysterious creature that thrives in the deepest fathoms of the frigid Arctic Ocean. Featuring incredible depth of malt flavor, rich with notes of espresso, baker’s cocoa, roasted grain and a light hint of smoke, Narwhal is a massive malt-forward monster. Aggressive but refined with a velvety smooth body and decadent finish, Narwhal will age in the bottle for years to come.

  • Specialty Malt

    Malted barley generally falls into two camps: base malt and specialty malt. Base malt is highly modified malt that is responsible for producing the bulk of the fermentable sugars in the beer. Specialty malt is malt added for its flavor, color or effect on the body and mouthfeel of the finished beer. Specialty malts are typically produced by kilning and/or roasting barley. Caramel malt is made by placing germinated barley with a high moisture content directly into a roaster. The resulting malt produces unfermentable sugars during the mashing process, adding sweetness and body to finished beer. Roasted malt is base malt that has been placed in a roaster similar to a coffee roaster to produce deeper, darker, baker’s cocoa and espresso flavors like those common in a porter or a stout.

  • Stout versus Porter

    While the exact origins of porter are hazy, the development of stout is more straightforward. By the 1700s, bolder, high-alcohol versions of any style of beer were referred to as “stout” or strong. By then, porter was far and away the most popular beer style in the British Isles, and clever breweries began advertising the stronger versions of their beers as “stout porter.” By the late 1800s, regular porters had fallen out of favor and stout porter, or simply stout, took their place. There are many different varieties of stout ranging from the light bodied, low alcohol Dry Irish Stout to the viscous, rich and strong Imperial Stout.

  • Aging Beer

    Most beer should be consumed as fresh as possible to experience the bright flavors and complexity the brewer intends. Occasionally, though, some styles of beer will progress and improve with a bit of age—not unlike a fine wine. Beers that are high in alcohol, have a moderate amount of roasted grains, use a wild yeast, are barrel-aged, and are bottle conditioned are prime candidates for aging. Over time, gradual oxidation changes the flavors of the beer, adding notes of sherry or port wine and smoothing out harsh alcohol flavors. Vintage beers should be stored in a dark place with a cool and constant temperature for best results. Barleywines and Imperial Stouts are great candidates for aging, and both Bigfoot and Narwhal will progress in the bottle for years.

Brewing is as much art as science, and all beer specifications and raw materials are subject to change
at our brewers' creative discretion.

Overview

  • Alcohol Content 10.2% by volume
  • Beginning gravity 24.2° plato
  • Ending Gravity 6.6° plato
  • Bitterness Units 60

Ingredients

  • Yeast Ale yeast
  • Bittering Hops Magnum, Challenger
  • Finishing Hops Challenger
  • Malts Two-row Pale, Caramel, Chocolate, Honey, Carafa, Roasted Barley

Food Pairing

  • Cuisine Chocolate Mousse, Braised Short Ribs, Tart Raspberry Cheesecake
  • Cheese Gorgonzola